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Spotify playlist

Account Options Sign in. Top charts. New releases. Spotify: Listen to new music, podcasts, and songs Spotify Ltd. Add to Wishlist. With Spotify, you can play millions of songs and podcasts for free. Listen to the songs and podcasts you love and find music from all over the world. Listen to music, albums, playlists, and podcasts wherever you are. With Spotify, you have access to a world of free music, curated playlists, artists, and podcasts you love. Discover new music, podcasts and listen to your favorite artists, albums, or create a playlist with the latest songs to suit your mood.
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With Sponsored Playlist, your brand connects with listeners on their favorite playlists. Our playlists already have a passionate, loyal fan base, ensuring that your brand is amplified and heard.
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We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. Playlists can be as long as two hours and be a mix of both podcasts and music, or people can keep it to just one or the other.
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Where people listen

Live concerts, gigs and festivals are out, but the need to feel transported to somewhere more beautiful via melodies, lyrics and rhythms has rarely been felt more keenly. In short, music has never been in greater demand. Whether you're after a selection of sounds to help you get a good night's sleep , tunes to entertain children at home or a selection of inspiring albums written in self-isolation , heading down to your local record shop and rifling through crates is off-menu right now. These offer a lockdown-approved lifeline at the click of a button — a chance to test-drive new tracks and try sounds before you buy. Spotify isn't our reigning champion when it comes to value, variety and audio quality, but its popularity and accessibility is undeniable. And the firm recently offered support for charities helping musicians during lockdown , as well as giving Spotify account-holders a chance to 'tip' acts while listening, too. If you've ever used Spotify, you'll know that typing 'new music' into the search bar will yield a selection of curated mainstream newness from the likes of Lady Gaga, Ella Eyre, Jake Bugg and Stormzy, and New Music Friday UK is always a good playlist shout here but what if you're looking for something a bit different? That's where we come in. Why not lend your and ear to a few of these slightly more niche curated playlists? Imagine a record store remember those?
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Starley Hope thought she was done with the music biz after writing "Call on Me. She released the track as her debut single in July, expecting it to be her swan song. It wasn't. It hit number one on the Swedish charts, and went gold or platinum in nine countries. Although you hear it all over the radio now, Spotify users found themselves bouncing along to her synthy strains seven months ago. The song owes much of its success to Spotify playlists. These playlists, created by individual users or Spotify "editors," form the curated labyrinth through which Spotify can lead an artist or song from obscurity to mass appeal. Think of it as the moneyball of music, a ruthlessly data-driven approach to introducing listeners to songs. Just as Facebook loves rolling out new features to a tiny subset of its users, killing what doesn't work and expanding on what does, Spotify considers every track a beta test. Nick Holmsten, the service's head of shows and editorial, claims he could dig into the data and tell you which new song will be a hit in six months.
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Starley Hope thought she was done with the music biz after writing "Call on Me. She released the track as her debut single in July, expecting it to be her swan song. It wasn't. It hit number one on the Swedish charts, and went gold or platinum in nine countries.

Although you hear it all over the radio now, Spotify users found themselves bouncing along to her synthy strains seven months ago. The song owes much of its success to Spotify playlists. These playlists, created by individual users or Spotify "editors," form the curated labyrinth through which Spotify can lead an artist or song from obscurity to mass appeal. Think of it as the moneyball of music, a ruthlessly data-driven approach to introducing listeners to songs.

Just as Facebook loves rolling out new features to a tiny subset of its users, killing what doesn't work and expanding on what does, Spotify considers every track a beta test. Nick Holmsten, the service's head of shows and editorial, claims he could dig into the data and tell you which new song will be a hit in six months.

He declined to prove it, but says his team certainly saw "Call on Me" coming. Spotify, Apple Music, and others have changed the people listen to music. In the process, they've changed the way artists and songs break. Still, the song didn't explode overnight. Two months after its release, a Spotify editor added it to the Danish version of the New Music Friday playlist.

Listeners took to it, according to Spotify's analytics that track how often people play a song, how much of that song they listen too, whether they add it to their own playlists, and more. Editors gave the song a little more exposure at the end of September when they added it to the Weekly Buzz and Pop Rising playlists, which count 1. When the song kept getting tens of thousands of streams daily, Spotify started peppering it into popular playlists worldwide, a strategy it calls "playlisting. On October 14, when nearly a million people were listening to the bouncy ballad each day, Spotify's editors added it to the Today's Top Hits playlist and its By the time a song lands on Today's Top Hits or other equally popular sets, Spotify has so relentlessly tested it that it almost can't fail.

When "Call On Me" made that list, it was already destined to go viral—even though most people had still never heard it. In November, the track was getting two million daily plays; it peaked in early February at 2. All told, Spotify users have streamed the Riback remix million times, and the original another 26 million times. It's a certified platinum hit, one only now blowing up on radio, more than half a year after Spotify telegraphed its success. Spotify, Apple Music, and other streaming services have fundamentally changed how people listen to music.

In the process, they've changed how artists and songs break. Radio may remain the most popular way of discovering music among casual fans, but unless you're Drake or Rihanna, it's hard to get any play. Plus, real fans—the people who go to concerts and buy merch and actually pay for music—use streaming services like Spotify. Facebook has more users, YouTube has more views, but Spotify represents more important real estate. Listeners now spend about half their time on Spotify listening to playlists, either of their own creation or curated by Spotify's editors and other tastemakers.

As a result, every artist wants a spot on the high-traffic playlists like Today's Top Hits or Rap Caviar. There's an official pitch process, a form anyone can fill out with details about their track and their hopes and dreams for world-beating success, but a little inside knowledge helps. You can't guarantee entry, but you can at least try putting your stuff in front of the right people. A while back, Walsh spent a sleepless weekend cataloging every Spotify playlist he could find, figuring out who and how to pitch for each one.

He and others like him want to understand what happens when you're the first song on a playlist, or fourth, or 14th; the difference between landing on a huge but varied playlist like Good Vibes 1. Many artists and labels, meanwhile, now promote playlists featuring their songs, hoping fans will listen and save, thus improving a track's outlook. Spotify's programming runs counter to how music traditionally worked. Radio is simple, relatively speaking: Stations create playlists through a mix of data and human curation, swayed by relationships and the songs DJs wanted you to love.

Spotify and other streaming services are all about data. People pull the levers that make it all work, sure, but you can't fake listener data. If a song works, it grows. If it doesn't, it dies. Holmsten says this process makes Spotify transparent with creators and impervious to their cajoling. Editors exert some control over how a song enters the Spotify Playlist Machine, but Holmsten swears musicians can't beg, borrow, or bribe their way into Today's Top Hits. He insists that the beauty of Spotify lies in the fact it offers more than one path to success.

The platform boasts fans of every imaginable genre; the key for artists is finding the right match. That's where editors become particularly important, scouring the musicverse for the tracks you'd love but would never find on the radio. Slowly but surely, labels and artists are learning how to engage with Spotify.

But even as they catch up, Spotify keeps complicating matters. After moving away from organizing music by albums, it's tossing aside genres, too. Like other streaming services, Spotify cares more about figuring out what you're doing, and what you want to hear while doing it—providing music for working out, sleeping, studying, commuting, and so on.

That will change how music is released, even what it sounds like. At the same time, Spotify is investing more in personalized playlists, like the algorithmically generated Discover Weekly and Daily Mix. Not to mention, as it learns more about what listeners like to listen to and when, the company could start to make tailored content—just as Netflix began making its own shows after discovering people really love Adam Sandler.

What does the recording biz do then? For Spotify, at least, the path forward will be paved with playlists. The company sees its network of playlists as its key differentiator—the place you go to find something to listen to, the perfect track plucked out of tens of millions of options. It doesn't matter whether that track comes from the biggest artist on the planet, or someone like Starley Hope, a something from Australia nobody's ever heard of. If you'll like it, it'll find you.

Spotify makes sure of that. Steve Lacy is a pretty big deal. He's part of the band The Internet, he's a producer for J. Cole and Kendrick Lamar, and he just put out his first solo album which he made on his iPhone. Related Video. His Phone Steve Lacy is a pretty big deal. Apple Music Music Spotify. View Comments. Sponsored Stories Powered By Outbrain.

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